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Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Binder : Missing Member's grave?

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A Missing Member's grave?
Hi Joe,
 
There is a  grave near Coppermine, NWT on the Tree River and the name of the RCM Policeman was Otto BINDER who died in 1922. 
 
Do you have anything on him at all? 
 
Yours truly, 
 
(...)
 
**The message above has been received, but to my knowledge, no one by that name was in the Force?

Can anyone help with this file?
'Maintain Our Memories'
J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Note: June 4, 2011: This Mystery has been solved, but only with the help of gritty, determined members and Vets.

For the solution to the Mystery, please go to the main page of www.rcmpgraves.com, see 'Buffalo Board' and then scroll down to  'The Mystery of the Nearby Buried Binder'.

You will be surprised!

RCMP Inuit Special Constables in the North

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Recalling our Inuit Special Constables in the North
'Friends Not Forgotten'

Hello Joe Healy:

I have a few names of our Special Constables from my memory and experience. To begin, I was born May, 1946 outside of Kimmirut, which used to be Lake Harbour in English.

Shiutiapik E7-1 was a special constable in the 1940's, then James Akavak. I think you are familier with what their duties were so I won't go into details.

There were many special constables around the north and most of them are forgotten. Our son-in-law, Sergeant Jimmy Akavak is a direct grand-son of James Akavak. Jimmy works in Iqaluit.  His father, Sandy Akavak was also a special constable in the 1970's.  He's retired now.

These men who went out of their way to help the RCMP members. Their wives too are forgotten. They made clothings, boots, socks for the RCMP members, on top of making clothing for her family members. They taught the members 'how to' wear northern clothing. 

Anyway, there are many stories about the dog team days and outpost camp patrols.  Every region had an Inuk RCMP Special Constable. In the High Arctic, I remember Kayak.  He received the Order of Canada in 1970. He's dead now. 

Then there was Panipakooshook from Pond Inlet. He guided the famous St. Roch around the high arctic down to Vancouver with that famous RCMP member Henry Larsen. His Inuktitut name was Palualuk.

I will provide more names from other regions, like Kivaliq, (Keewatin), Central Arctic and Cape Dorset area.

Taima for now,

Ann Meekitjuk Hanson
[mailto:ahanson@northwestel.net]

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Monday, May 30, 2011

Reg.#1197, Sgt. G. F. 'Skinny' Adams

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Reg.#1197, Sgt. George Frederick 'Skinny' Adams, NWMP
'Friends Not Forgotten'
Hi Joe; 

I did some poking around about 'Skinny' Adams and it led to an interesting story. 'Skinny' had gone to BC to do some hiking. He must have slipped then fell into 3 feet of water in a ditch and drowned. He was 78 years of age when he died and the accident happened in Richmond, BC.

While in the NWMP, he got himself into trouble twice. Once for not exercising the horses when told, and another time for not getting them water when he was stable orderly at 'Depot'. He was CB'd for 10 days.

How things have changed! 'Skinny' left the Force at some point and then re-engaged in 1900. He continued on until 1911.

Our thanks go out to:

Cpl K. M. Derksen,
HQ' Policy Program Drug Evaluation Branch

'Maintain Our Memories'
J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Sunday, May 29, 2011

In Memory of Cst. Nancy Puttkemmery

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In Memory of Reg.#33112, Nancy Puttkemmery
Troop 21, 1975/1976

'Friends Not Forgotten'

Hi Joe;

First, congratulations on your endeavor, this is an incredible site and I can't begin to think of the hours you have put into this. Does it surprise me, absolutely not. Congratulations on such a worthwhile cause. It has been done with alot of dedication and patience.

I was reading Nancy Puttkemmery's file on your database. I was one of her troopmates and I was at her funeral that cold and wintery day. I was also present at our 20th yr Troop Reunion in Regina. Our Troop dedicated a tree at 'Depot' to her memory.

On both ocasions, I was a part of the Honor Guard in full Regimental Uniform Order One.
It was a honor to be part of that and to have been one of Nancy's(Putt Putt) troopmates.


Keep up the good work Joe and if I can be a volunteer to assist with site locations and/or maintenance please let me know.

Yours truly,

Mary Ellen Doig (aka 'Deputy')
Retired RCMP Sgt. Reg.#33096
'Maintain Our Memories'
J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Saturday, May 28, 2011

In Memory of (Dad) Reg.#10759, Geo Thom

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In Memory of Reg.#10759, George Thom

'Friends Not Forgotten'
Dear Joe;

In your automated e-mail response, you were asking for stories. I can recall a story that Dad told us about his training in Regina, and in particular the training with the horses. 

My Dad was by no means a rider, but was very good driving horses after his years on a farm on the prairies after he arrived from Scotland.  On this particular day, his Troop had to ride bare back, and had to go over a small jump. Dad recalled that he was petrified as he was having trouble staying on the horse without a saddle. 

He and the horse approached the jump and over they went. Dad stayed on the horse hanging on for dear life, but he slid up the horse's neck.  He was very proud of himself for managing to stay on, but that lasted only for a short second. The next thing he heard was a blast from the instructor berating him for having dismounted.  Although he was still on the horse, obviously it was not in the right place!

Margaret Thom
Ottawa, Ontario
'A Story of My Father'

'Maintien Our Memories'
J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Friday, May 27, 2011

The RCMP's first OIC Detachment

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Dear Joe;
In reply to your note, yes, my dad passed away, as you state, on Feb. 20, 1987. He passed away at Port Moody, BC and he is buried in the family plot at Mountainview Cemetery in Vancouver, BC.

Dad joined the BC Provincial Police in 1931 and of course came to the RCMP in the takeover in 1950. At that time, he was a corporal. He had been born in Glasgow, Scotland on August 10th, 1901 and came to Canada with his family in 1914.
His father, also John Macdonald, joined the BCPP and retired as an Inspector. 
Dad was in charge of Burnaby Detachment at the time of his retirement and had originally held that position as a Staff Sergeant. When he was commissioned to Inspector, Burnaby became the first detachment to be commanded by an Officer.  At the time, Burnaby was Canada largest detachment.

Burnaby Detachment's first OIC was Reg. #0.479 (#16306) Inspector John Archibald Mcdonald. Two sons were also in the Force; Reg.#16817 Ian Douglas Macdonald and Reg.#20654 Rod Macdonald.
Yours truly,
Rod Macdonald
Reg.#20654

*Dear Rod,
Thanks very much for your interesting note which truly forms our history. As an aside, I arrived from 'Depot' to Burnaby Det. in May, 1965. This was shortly after your Dad had retired. Your Dad would have been followed by Reg. # 0.499 Insp. F.L. Jeeves who was my first OIC in Burnaby.
I believe Insp. Jeeves was followed by Insp. Gibbons and then possibly Insp. R. H. Simmonds?

Buffalo Joe Healy
Reg. # 23685

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#15581, Cst. D. E. Woodall

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In Memory of
Reg.#15581, Constable Douglas Ernest Woodall
'Friends Not Forgotten
Dear Mr. Healy;

I am Douglas Woodall's daughter Kimberley.

Thank you for remembering my wonderful father; my favorite person in the world, a true friend who was always loyal and loving and honest. He was a father who put others first especially our Mom Betty.

She was a fabulous Mom who passed away on October 17,2009. Mom and Dad loved each other very much. They are both missed by many who loved them also.

They left behind siblings, children,  grand children and great grandchildren, and many happy memories.

God Bless,

Kimberley

Kindly check the database to read more of Constable Woodall's career.

My thanks to Vet. Jack O'Reilly for correcting an error in this note which I had made. My apologies.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Sunday, May 22, 2011

In Memory: Reg.#17104, S/Sgt. D. R. Wilson

C A N A D A

Reg.# 17104, Staff Sgt Douglas Roy 'Skip' Wilson
'Friends Not Forgotten'
Dear Joe:

I have just returned from a trip to Regina and visited the  RCMP 'Depot' Columbarium C.

It's the resting place of Reg.# 17104, Staff/Sgt Douglas Roy 'Skip' Wilson. I once again thank you and your friends for your assistance in this regard.  It has meant so much to me to visit his gravesite and say goodby to my special high school friend.

Please let me know the address where I may send a donation to your organization.

Blessings,

Merle McTaggart
 
'Maintain Our Memories'
 
J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685
(Dear Merle, no donations are expected or accepted for this Project)

Friday, May 20, 2011

Brothers: Reg.#7549 and Reg.#9821

C A N A D A

Two Brothers : One Team
Reg.#7549 and Reg.#9821

'Friends Not Forgotten'


Reg.#7549, Frederick William Ian Pole Innis-Taylor on the left,
and Reg.#9821, Charles Alan Kenneth Innis-Taylor

The photo of the Innis-Taylor brothers is a contribution of Supt. Brian Brennan, OIC Federal Policing, 'H' Div. Halifax.

Supt. Brennan says: 'nice connection between 2 brothers and the RNWMP.'

For the interst of our readers, you may read issue V44(4) for the obituary of Reg.#7549, and issue V49(1) for the obituary of Reg.#9821.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Thursday, May 19, 2011

A Magnificent, Monumental, Memorable Canadian Mystery

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A Magnificent, Monumental, Memorable Canadian Mystery

I am firmly convinced that every family has a person within who carries a secret which they have buried deep within their heart. Few, if anyone, knows the truth. The secret might be a crime committed long, long ago. Maybe someone in the family went to prison. It might be that someone lost their wealth through a deal gone wrong. No one is allowed to discuss it.

Perhaps a marriage went off the rails long ago, or maybe a baby was born and the family has kept its birth a secret. Maybe an uncle was shot during war and wants it not to be discussed. The possibilities are endless. The point is simply that no one wants to be embarrased by an incident which happened generations ago. It has no bearing on life today.

Recall that it's coincidental that the secret of Staff Sergeant McIntosh (alias Martin) has only recently come to light. And truthfully, the secret turned out to be a wee bit comical. McIntosh lived a double life; he was married with children when he joined the North West Mounted Police. McIntosh served the Force honourably for twenty five years. He was successful with promotions and he was distinguished by retirement followed by a pension.

But, keeping the family secret from others is the problem. 'Be careful not to let it slip out after a glass of wine or two...!' If they should learn, friends can be mean and not ever let the secret die.

Down through the years, I have met people, men in particular, who have taken a secret to their grave. In one case years ago, an acquaintence of mine died. His secret was his wealth. No one paid any particular attention to him because he preferred not to draw attention to himself. I only became involved in the case when I was notified by his lawyer. It was a year after my acquaintence died.

In other cases, I've been called quietly by Police Chaplains to attend mass for unidentified prostitutes. They were murdered. There was no one else in the Chapel. But for the Chaplain, no one knows they are gone. Costs for burial are quietly paid by the state.

Beginning with the days of the North West Mounted Police, the Clan Healy has been prominant in the Force. Some secrets about the Healy's and the Force have been published. It's well known, for instance, that an ancestor 'Joe Healy' was an active and well-to-do bootlegger at Fort Whoop-Up upon the arrival of the NWMP. 

But, there remains to this day a Healy family secret which has never hit the light of day. I've never told anyone about it. Only two of my siblings know the secret. Over the past year, I've let it slip to one or two of my most trusted friends.

After nearly thirty seven years in the Force, the secret will soon be revealed. It's important that I not carry this secret to my grave. Friends who thought they knew me well while in the Force, will be shocked. The remainder of my family will be shocked.

The Healy secret is connected to the RCMP, a long ago deceased member of the Force, and the 'The Mad Trapper'. Due to the very personal nature of the secret, I've wished to change the name of the case to 'The Saga of the Sad Trapper'.

Soon, you too will know the reason.

'Maintain our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Reg.#41, the Mysterious Mr. McIntosh

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In Memory of
Mr. McIntosh, Mystery, Marriage and a Mother

It's time the reader knew. The North West Mounted Police (NWMP) was first built on a mysterious story of fabrication. Fear not, the Force lives on. The statute of limitation has expired. So has the Mysterious Mr. McIntosh.

Read the full story.

Go to Home Page: www.rcmpgraves.com. Scroll down to Buffalo Board on the left. Scroll down to 'The Mystery of the Married Mountie - Who Wasn't.'

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Monday, May 16, 2011

Last Post: Reg.#19207, S/S/M W. D. Barker

C A N A D A


'Friends Not Forgotten'

Obituary. Reg.#19207, Staff Sergeant Major
William Davies Barker (Retired)

In Hospital, at Ottawa, on Thursday, May 12, 2011. Bill was born in West Vancouver, BC on January 16, 1921.

Beloved husband, for 68 years, of Eleanore (nee Sherwood). Loved father of Judith (Richard Sandbrook), Pamela (Robert Booth), and Elizabeth Lilley. Cherished grandfather of Tim, Samantha, and Jessica. Bill will be remembered for his talents as a Rock and Alpine gardener, his exquisite handmade to scale ships, and his watercolours.

Family and friends may call at the Westboro Chapel of Tubman Funeral Homes, 403 Richmond Road (at Roosevelt) on Thursday, May 19, 2011 from 1:00 pm followed by a Memorial Service which will be held in the Chapel at 2:00 pm. 

Notice Appreciation: Vets Ottawa Div.

'Maintain our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685


Sunday, May 15, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#41104, D. A. Norman

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In Memory of Reg.#41104, David A. Norman
'Friends Not Forgotten'

Reg.# 41104 / S.875 (Rtd) Constable David Alfred Norman passed away from a heart attack at his residence in Innisfil, ON May 6, 2011. 

Dave was 73 years.  He served in the Force from 1973 to 1995 in ‘O’ Division at Toronto's Pearson International Airport.

'Maintain Our Memories'

Obituary acknowledgement: Toronto Vet Jack O'Reilly

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Saturday, May 14, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#616, Cst. T. Ashbaugh

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North West Mounted Police
Reg.#616, Constable Thomas Ashbaugh
'Friends Not Forgotten'

Constable Thomas Ashbaugh was born in 1854. He joined the NWMP on April 12, 1882. After about three years service, he was discharged from the Force for medical reasons in 1885.

During his short career, Constable Ashbaugh served in 'F' Div. (Saskatchewan). In 1885, he was at the start of the Riel Rebellion at Battleford, SK and he was also in the Battle of Cut Knife Hill.

After the NWMP, Constable Thomas Ashbaugh returned to Ontario. He died in 1914 as a stranger, destitute and alone. He was buried in a pauper's unmarked grave in Grove Cemetery, Dundas, Ontario.

Cst. Ashbaugh's grave was initially located through research by Vet. Merle Armstrong. Vet. Bob Elliott has arranged for the ceremony for Cst. Ashbaugh.

Vets of the Golden Horseshoe Division have arranged to place a marker on Cst. Ashbaugh's grave on May 29, 2011 at 1 PM and a short grave side ceremony will be held in his honour.

Credit Source: May 14th, 2011 Hamilton Spectator.

Thanks also to Vet. Jack White
and Vet. Jack O'Reilly

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Friday, May 13, 2011

Last Post: Reg.#15581, Cst D. E. Woodall

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In memory of Reg.#15581, Cst. Douglas Ernest WOODALL
 Life Member of Toronto Vets

'Friends Not Forgotten'

Reg.#15581, former Constable Douglas Ernest Woodall passed away at the Dorothy Macham Home at Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto ON on May 7, 2011. 

He served in the Force from 1948 to 1951 in ‘O’ Div and the Musical Ride.  He also served in WW II. 

After leaving the Force, Doug started the first Insurance Restoration Contracting Firm in Toronto which became very successful and branched out across southern Ontario.

Douglas Woodall was a Life Member of the Toronto Vets.

'Maintain Our Memories'

Obituary acknowledgement: Toronto Vet Jack O'Reilly

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Sunday, May 8, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#26112, Cpl. R. Teather

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In Memory of Reg.#26112, Cpl. Robert Teather

'Friends Not Forgotten'



Corporal Robert 'Bob' Gordon Teather was born in Hamilton, Ontario and he joined the Force in September 1967. 
His postings included North Vancouver Detachment, Surrey Detachment, 'E' Division Dive Team, and 'E' Division Protective Services Unit. He was recognized as a trained Hostage Taker-Barricaded Person Negotiator and a Forensic Diving Instructor. In addition, Bob found time to write and publish books including: The Underwater Investigator; Encyclopedia  Underwater Investigations; and Scarlet Tunic – V 1 & V 2. 
Very espeially though, it was through his persistence and dedication that he was formally and publically recognized. His story follows...
On September 26, 1981, Corporal  Teather while serving at the Surrey Detachment and a on-call member of the 'E' Division Dive Team were called to assist with the rescue of two fishermen trapped in the overturned hull of a boat.
Early that morning, the boat Respond collided with a freighter near the mouth of the Fraser River in British Columbia. The boat capsized with the two crewmen stranded on board. Cpl. Teather and a colleague arrived on the scene. Their exploratory dive proved that only one diver could enter the hull at a time. Teather was inexperienced in this type of rescue, but he was aware that the boat was sinking and that qualified help was miles away. Despite the lack of personnel support and unaware if the two crew members were alive he entered the ship's companion-way.   
As visibility was limited to a few centimetres inside, Cpl. Teather  made his way into the engine room. Most of his way through the ship was done by touch. When he reached the galley, Cpl. Teather opened the door and made his way to front of the vessel. In an air pocket fouled by diesel fumes he found the two men: one of them a non-swimmer, and their pet dog. He instructed both on the use of underwater breathing equipment. Cpl. Teather then took the non-swimmer on his back to safety.
The door to the galley that Teather had opened shut on him, but he managed to feel his way around to the handle to open in. During that time, the seaman panicked and knocked his rescuer's mask off.  Cpl. Teather managed to pin the man against the wall of the galley and  put the man's goggles and the re-breather back on so he could get the man to the surface where the another diver took over. Cpl. Teather then retrieved the other survivor using the same method.
While at the surface, Cpl. Teather strongly suggested that he go back down to the vessel with a bucket filled with air, put the dog's head in the bucket, and assist the dog in reaching the surface. Senior officials frowned upon the idea, stating the dog's life is not worth his own with the possibility of being trapped in the vessel. Cpl. Teather  was relieved to learn the next day when the ship was towed to shore and the dog somehow managed to stay alive.
If Cpl. Teather had not undertaken the rescue, the two fishermen would likely have drowned or succumbed to asphyxiation.  For his efforts, Cpl. Teather was awarded  the Cross of Valour on  April 25, 1983 by the Governor General of Canada. 
The Cross of Valour is the highest ranking of the Canadian Bravery Decoration and the only other higher bravery award is the Victoria Cross.  Currently, there have been only 20 receipients of the Cross of Valour. Cpl. Robert Teather was the 13th receipient of this Medal and the first RCMP member to receive it. 


Sadly, on November 15, 2004, Cpl. Robert Teather passed away at the Surrey Memorial Hospital of natural causes with diabetes. 

Bob Teather was the most caring and humble person. All are proud of him.

'Maintain our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
with Vet. Sheldon Boles

Saturday, May 7, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#14921, Cst. G. E. Willby

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Last Post: Reg.#14921, Cst. George Edward Willby

'Friends Not Forgotten'

Reg.# 14921, former Cst. George Edward Willby passed away at St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto ON on February 17, 2011.

There was no funeral as he had no family in Canada.  George was cremated and his ashes are held by Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Toronto awaiting interment instructions.

George Willby was a Past President (1967) of the Toronto Vets and a Life Member. He celebrated his 90th birthday on February 1, 2011.

George served in the Force from May 1947 to July 1948. He then coverted  to the Metro Toronto Police Service. 

George Willby served in WW II.

'Maintain our Memories' 

Notice appreciation: Vets. Toronto Div.

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Friday, May 6, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#4493, A.S.C. Birtwistle

C A N A D A


'Friends Not Forgotten'

In Memory of Reg.#4493, Sergeant A. (Archie) . S. C. Birtwistle


RCMP/GRC Vet's Work on Graves
on
'L' Div. Prince Edward Island

For many years, 'L' Div. RCMP Vets have been working hard to care and preserve the condition of graves of deceased RCMP members on the Island.

Reg.#4493, Archie Birtwistle is one such member who is buried on the Island. Sergeant Birtwhistle's granddaughter Ms Jill Thompson inspects his grave along with retired Sgt. Dave Holmes (center).

An article written about the 'L' Div. Vets work can be read at the following link:




Congratulation to our Vets on the Island!

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Thursday, May 5, 2011

In Memory of S/S/M 'Harry' Armstrong

C A N A D A

'Friends Not Forgotten'
Riding Master Staff Sergeant Major
Reg.#15067 'Harry' Armstrong

Dear Vets;
I was a member of 'C' Troop 1957-58 at 'Depot' Div., Reg.# 19956.

I joined the RCMP at St John's, NL on 2 May l957 and was freed from having to ride the CN all the way to Regina as recruits had to do;  there was an ice jam in the Cabot Strait and then CN ferries
could not operate between Port aux Basques and North Sydney. 

I arrived via TCH plane at Regina which was experiencing a heat wave of 30 degrees Celcius and which lasted for several days. The Duty Driver picked me up at the aeroport and he took me to the Orderly Room.  The rapid temperature change over so short a period, caused me to become very ill. As Orderly Corporal, then Corporal Harry Armstrong awaited me. 

He looked pretty mean at first, but upon seeing the state I was in, he sent me directly to the
Post Hospital and old Mike, the Force's Orderly admitted me for a couple of days till I fully recovered despite my fears that I would be 'back squadded' or paraded out the North Gate as some suggested.

Life for me at Depot was great save for the food when compared  to the meals served by civilian French cooks on white table cloth-tables in the Air Force messes regardless,  I grew up with
horses and though I missed the session learning how to put a saddle on a horse according to RCMP protocol, I soon learned the technique. Harry was our Equatation instructor and there certainly was none finer in the Force. 

I got a chance to tell him so at the AGM of the Vets at Halifax, Nova Scotia, some years ago. Harry's star really shone. I think all thirty-one members of 'C' Troop shared my respect for then Corporal Armstrong.  He was one of the best riders that the Force ever produced and I was surprised later to learn that he was born in the Duchy of Devon, in West-Country England and next door to County Devon the acestral home of my mother's people. We all assumed that he was born in a saddle on a ranch somewhere in rural Alberta though he might have grown up on one if memory seves me well.

Harry had a gelding which he rode. It was not the pussycat that my horse 'Hero' was, and though Harry told my sister at that AGM in Halifax that I was damn good, he could pass on knowledge so easily and so well. Harry was a born leader of men and he was so proud that he was chosen to present a horse earlier to Her Majesty, the Queen at London, UK.  The RCMP leadership, I think, wisely chose the best man they had for the job. It was that simple and moreover, Harry looked the part, did he not? Yet, I found him as a recruit to be a just and kind man ever respectful of authority but simultaneously his own person.

Yet, barrack life is barrack life and there were ways to ease the rules if one looked at Depot.  S/M Peacock whom I think served overseas during WW II, was a fierce-looking giant, but decent, good-mannered and a righteous person. In fact, having Corporal McGuire for Physical Training and Mr Dean, as he then was, for swimming, 'C' Troop surely had the "creme de la creme" of police instructors of that era. But Harry Armstrong's star shone so brightly. It was a Nova.

I left the Force early in life and ended graduating in law at UBC and then practising till retirement in Newfoundland and Labrador. Yet, I never forgot how devoted to Canada, the RCMP, his horse and his recruit-charges the Harry Armstrong I knew, was. He was certainly "a prince of princes." He used to come to work at 'Depot' at 6:00 a.m. every weekday, and spend some time with his Gelding whose name now slips my mind. 

Harry could ride so well without stirrups and he showed me how to do it too.  I never fell off a horse in training and only once since I left the Force when I kept horses of my own at Strathlaurie House and farm here on Bell Island, NL. Harry used to live the 30 degree from heel to toe and from toe to the horse rule so rigidly. In fact, he used to press down so hard in the stirrups that
he broke  the arches of his riding boots. 

I have a gut reaction that Harry Armstrong freed of the ills of this Vale of Tears is looking down with that big smile from ear to ear that personified the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

You know on a fatigues day when I was not Duty Driver, Harry sent me off with Mike and fellow recruit Larry Mazur, now deceased too, to use a farm tractor to pull barb wire while repairing the fences in the pasture behind the stable in view of the Pinkie, SK, sole granary. Whether we deserved it or not, while other instructors barked out orders, Harry used to say I know you can do it and we tried out utmost for him.

Thanks for opportunity to remember Harry!

"May he rest in peace and perpetual light shine over him!"
Yours faithfully

Michael J. Laurie, NP., BA., LL.B., J.D.
Strathlaurie House
48 Main Street,
Wabana, Bell Island, NL  A0A 1H0
Tel; (709)  488-3818
Cell (709) 697-0988

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685