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Friday, June 29, 2012

BuffaloBlog - out of order


Dear Friends;

This Blog will no longer publish due to sickness in our family.

Yours truly,

Joe
Reg.#23685
June 29, 2012


Thursday, June 28, 2012

In Memory of Reg.#13057, Hector John MacDonald

 In Memory of Reg.#13057, Hector John MacDonald
'Friends Not Forgotten'

To President Don Day, Ottawa Div.:

Reg.# 13057 Hector John MacDonald was a member of Ottawa Vets. He passed away in Toronto on June 5, 2012. I noticed his name on Jim Forsyth’s 'Vets Net Last Post' so I expect someone from Ottawa Division sent the obituary to Jim Forsyth.

Hec was living in Toronto and attended some of our meetings and social functions, although he wished to remain a member of Ottawa Division. I called his son Ian, to offer condolences and also to ask where his ashes were going to be buried and if there was going to be a Memorial Service.

Ian tells me Hec’s ashes will eventually be going to Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa. There will be a Memorial Service but Ian did not know at this time if it would be in Toronto or Ottawa.

I asked him to contact you if the Memorial Service was in Ottawa and they wanted members of the Vets to attend and to contact me if it is being held in Toronto.

Regards – Jack O’Reilly
Vets, Toronto Div.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Reg.#5700 / O.209, Assistant Commissioner A. N. Eames


Reg.#5700 / O.209 
Assistant Commissioner A. N. Eames

'Friends Not Forgotten'

Assistant Commissioner Alexander Neville Eames of Vancouver BC was buried at noon today in a private ceremony which was held at the RCMP Memorial Cemetery at Beechwood Cemetery, Ottawa Ontario.

RCMP Superintendent J. J. Healy (R'td) of Ottawa conducted the Christian Service of the Dead in the presence of Mr. James Patterson.

Today's Memorial Service closes the final chapter of an RCMP Officer who led an unusual and exciting portion of his life in the Arctic. In historical accounts, Assistant Commissioner  Eames demonstrated that he was dedicated to preserving the lives of his subordinate police officers while also maintaining peace in Canada.

Assistant Commissioner A. N. Eames' personality, integrity, confidence, work ethic, ideals and professional police officer attributes illuminated all the fine features of the Royal North West Mounted Police (RNWMP) and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP).

He will long be remembered. He long inspired my life as a police officer.

St. Michael, Protector of Police Officers Be Pleased.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Monday, June 25, 2012

Last Post: Reg.#18446 and Reg.#17146


Last Post: Reg.#18446, S/Sgt. Hal Grainger 
and Reg.#17146, 'Harv' Wilson

'Friends Not Forgotten'

I must inform you of the passing of ret.'d S/Sgt. Hal Grainger age 78 yrs. on June 19th. He was at one time the Chief Clerk of the Nova Scotia Provincial Court as well as a past President of the RCMP Veterans Association.  A memorial service will take place at 1100hrs. on Thursday June 28th., 2012 at the Iona Presbyterian Church on Lucien Drive in Dartmouth.

On March 5th., 2012, former RCMP member Harv Wilson age 79 yrs. passed on.  He had served in Halifax, Sheet Harbour, Pictou County, Cape Breton, Halifax International Airport and Bedford. A celebration in his memory will take place on Friday June 29th., 2012 at the Dartmouth Funeral Home on Queen Street at 1300hrs.

Our warmest condolences go out to both families,

S/S/M Gary M. Latour, S.-m.é.-m.
Protocol, Dress and Deportment NCO, "H" Division 
and
C/Supt. Brian Brennan,
CROPS. 'H' Div. 

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Sunday, June 24, 2012

The Mystery of the Reg.# Under a Saddle

 The Mystery of the Reg.# Under a Saddle

'Friends Not Forgotten'

This note was received today from Mr. David Thompson-Upton.

Dear Joe;

"I am emailing you in regards to a NWMP California style saddle that we have on loan at Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park, Alberta. 

This saddle is marked with the number 386 under it and I was thinking it possibly could be a Reg. #?  

I ran the Reg #386 on your database and it comes back to a Robert Stewart but he was only in the Force from 1879 to 1880.   

However, this type of saddle was not in use with the NWMP until 1884, or so, and by that time Robert Stewart had left the Force. 

So, I am wondering if you could possibly help me with what the number could be?  

Possibly the saddle belonged to a member that had been posted at Police Coulee near Writing-on-Stone Prov Park which started with a tent camp in 1887 and ran until 1918".

Mr. Thompson-Upton has concluded that the saddle with the #386 does not belong to Reg.#386, Constable Robert Stewart.

Does anyone think they know the answer to the riddle?

'Maintain Our Memories'


J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Saturday, June 23, 2012

Pay And Benefits 1964




'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Pay and Benefits - 1964






'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Friday, June 22, 2012

Thursday, June 21, 2012

In Memory of Reg.#2115, Hugh McDermot


The Mystery, Murder and the Final Minutes 
of Reg.#2115, Constable Hugh McDermot 

by Edmonton Vet. AJH 'Joe' Collison

Few murders are neat. Few murderers are neat. In fact, any murderers whom I have met are mostly messed up, maladjusted malefactors. But, then again, a murderer's recipe of motives is mixed with money, hate, greed, conspiracy, blood and revenge. 
 
Few if any Canadians would believe the Mysterious Mess of Murders and Mix-Ups which Vet. Joe Collinson presents. I'll leave the story to him.

J. J. (Buffalo Joe) Healy

Hugh McDermot's life began on an up swing; he was Irish and a medical student in Dublin. But, he dropped out of his studies and immigrated to Canada apparently to join the North West Mounted Police (NWMP).


McDermot was born in an upper house; the son of 'The McDermot', Prince of Coolavin. McDermot Senior was, at that time, a prominent and well-respected solicitor who went on to become the Attorney-General of Ireland circa 1890. 
 
Constable McDermot successfully joined the Force on April 16, 1888, however, his upswing began to take downturns in the NWMP. He appeared in Service Court for several infractions. On October 28, 1889 he was declared 'Absent from Piquet Mounting' (Fire Drill) in Battleford, SK and fined $1 by Superintendent Antrobus.

On October 26, 1893 he was charged for 'Neglect of Duty' - his fault was allowing prisoners to loiter when they should have been at work. For this offence, he was fined $5 plus 28 days Confined To Barracks plus an extra week as Provost Duty. In November, 1893, McDermot was 'Absent from Duty' at Lethbridge AB, he did break (left) barracks while under arrest, and was drunk. In this case, he was given one month Hard Labour and he was to be dismissed at the expiration of his sentence. 


And these were the good days for Constable McDermot.

In the opinion of superior Officers, Constable McDermot had unsatisfactory abilities and behaviours to serve as an effective policeman. 

 
He simply was unreliable and not consistently attentive to his duties. However, he was given one additional reprive. He was offered the position of Medical Orderly (MO) at Regina's 'Depot' but over time he was found to be ineffective on the job. Strangely, but McDermot's Service File shows that there was an effort to promote him but this strategy was unsuccessful. McDermot was finally dismissed.


McDermot's service in the he Force added up to 4 years and six months which included a re-engagement (trial) period. He was discharged on December 21, 1893. After having served in the Force, the NWMP lost track of him although he apparently worked in a Saskatchewan bank and lived with his sister.

In 1924, he was known to be living alone in or near Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta. Then tragedy.

In 1925, McDermot took in a homeless wanderer. He thought, apparently, that he could get some house work out of the gypsy man and in exchange, McDermot offered the man free room and board. It wasn't long before McDermot's in-house guest began to plot that is, think of the unthinkable.

We're not sure, but perhaps the wandering gypsy was of the opinion that McDermot had wealth. Suddently, one night, the gypsy man bashed McDermot over the head. After the murder, McDermot was thrown head first into his well and a watery death for certain. McDermot's body was recovered.

It was only a short time that the murder of McDermot was discovered by authorities. The wanderer was rapidly apprehended, charged for murder, convicted, and sentenced to death. But, Miss Lady Luck Law intervened and the wandering gypsy had his sentence commuted to life. I am uncertain when the gypsy man died.

And was that the end of Mr Bad Luck for the former Constable McDermot? Not by a long shot, for I have often asked myself whatever became of McDermot's corpus?
 

I have concluded that McDermot must have been destitute or perhaps no one cared to care for him. For all purposes, he died  an underdog; underwater, undernourished and undermined. Unfairly, perhaps. For now I am about to reveal another McDermot tradegy.


 
I discovered that Constable McDermot lies in an an unmarked grave!  Where, you ask? How so?
 

Former Constable McDermot lies alone in the Roman Catholic Cemetery in Lamoureux, AB. which is one of Alberta's oldest settlements located just across the North Saskatchewan River from Fort Saskachewan. I found his gravesite but I had to put a cardboard marker up to identify and photograph his space.

Who knows, maybe someday a proper headstone will be erected? For the present time, McDermot's resting place is undeniably unidentifiable. Sad, eh?

 
Source: Specific dates for this yarn were taken from Vet Jack White's history files and I am appreciative of his previous work.

 AJH 'Joe' CollinsonJune 18, 2012

'Maintain our Memories'

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

In Memory of NWMP Reg.#o43, G. M. Steele

In Memory of North West Mounted Police
Reg.#o43, G. M. Steele 

'Friends Not Forgotten'


Source and Acknowledgement:  
The Canadian Gravemarker Gallery and 'E' Div Vet. AJH 'Joe' Collinson

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Reg.#5072, Constable William Graham Binning


'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Constable T. J. Gibbons & Constable G. R. Arnold

Please Click on Photo to Enlarge




'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Monday, June 18, 2012

In Memory of Reg.#36413, James Robert Andrews


Last Post: Reg.#15742, William Alan Bean

Last Post: Reg.#15742, William Alan Bean 

'Friends Not Forgotten' 

William Alan Bean passed away, May 30, 2012, at the Greater Niagara General Hospital, at the age of 82. Beloved husband of Marjorie for 61 years. 

Loving father of Bill (Dora), Kitchener, Marsha, BC, Ruth McGarry, Ottawa, Charles (Tash), Calgary and Susan Livingston (Gary), Collingwood. Cherished grandfather of 4 grandchildren and 4 great grandchildren. 

Cremation has taken place. 

A memorial service to celebrate Bill’s life will be held at Christ Church, Zimmerman Ave.(and River Rd.), on Tuesday, June 5, 2012 at 1 p.m. Burial to follow in Lundy’s Lane Cemetery.

 If so desired, donations to either GNGH Foundation or to Christ Church Bell Fund, would be appreciated by the family. Memories, photos and condolences may be shared at http://www.morseandson.com/  

William joined the Force in 1949 and served in 'Depot'; 'N' & 'H' Div. before purchasing his discharge in 1950.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Sunday, June 17, 2012

Last Post: Reg.#42179, Constable C. S. Singleton


 Last Post: Reg.#42179, Constable Cyril Sterling Singleton
'Friends Not Forgotten'
Cst Cyril (Cy) Sterling Singleton (RT'D) died at approx. 9.30PM on Thursday evening 14th. June 2012 at the QE Hospital Charlottetown, PEI. He is survived by his partner Lorraine MacMillan. 
His Memorial Service will be held at Belvedere Funeral Home, 175 Belvedere Avenue, Charlottetown, PEI on Monday June 18th. 2012, tentatively set for 2PM (will confirm later) www.belvederefh.com
It was Cy's wishes that there be a Red Serge presence at his Memorial Service. S/S/M Larry Kavanagh is arranging an Honour Guard of RCMP.
Cy is being cremated and there will be no visiting period at the funeral home, just the memorial service. I will also be contacting our two chaplains and soliciting their attendance.
Cyril joined the Force in 1981 as a S/Cst. and served 'K' Div. from 1981-1990 at which time he was promoted to Regular Member.  He retired in 1997.

 Contributor: Kamloops Vet. Steve Holotuk CFE, CIP

'Maintain Our Memories' 
J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Saturday, June 16, 2012

In Memory of Reg.#18300, Superintendent G. J. Davis


 In Memory of Reg.#18300, Superintendent Geoffrey John Davis

'Friends Not Forgotten'

The photo of Superintendent Davis was received from his daughter Jody.

Jody, thank you for this memorable snap from 1953 -- I think it may have been taken at 'Depot's Flag Mast.

O.927, G. J. Davis was born in 1932 in Nelson, BC.  He served a full career from 1953 to 1989 in 'D' and 'E' Div's. 

Jody's father died in 2007 and he is buried in Vernon, BC.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Friday, June 15, 2012

Queen's Representative - Governor General Roland Michener


GOVERNOR GENERAL AND MRS ROLAND MICHENER VISIT PEI 
IN ADVANCE OF HER MAJESTY'S VISIT

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Kamloops Memorial for Three Deceased Members 1962


'E' Div. Kamloops Memorial for Three Deceased Members 1962

'Friends Not Forgotten'

The outline which follows about the events of June 18, 1962 was sent to me my Troopmate, my Pit Partner, Ken Harrach.

On June 18th 1962 at approximately 09:00 in the morning, Mr. George Ferguson, a Provincial Game Warden, called the Kamloops RCMP to report that he and his partner had been threatened near the Provincial Government Administration Building by a gun-wielding man, later identified as George Booth. Booth suffered from mental illness but at the time, people in the community did not consider him to be dangerous. Booth spent much of his time alone in the bush and was known to be a good shot with his .303 rifle. His father claimed that Booth could split a match at 50 yards.

Cst Joe Keck, Regimental # 19233 (age 25), took the complaint from Mr. Ferguson and at 09:20 am and reported the incident to the Officer in Charge.  Cst Keck and Cst Gord Pedersen, Regimental #20865 (age 23), went out to investigate the matter.  Cst Donald Weisgerber, Regimental #20215 (age 23), was off duty but was in the office at the time and accompanied Cst Keck and Cst Pedersen in the investigation.  Cst Keck and Pedersen were in their RCMP uniform with their sidearms while Cst Weisgerber was in plainclothes and unarmed.

When the 3 officers arrived at the downtown Administration Building, Cst Pedersen entered from the main entrance.  Cst Keck and Weisgerber entered by a rear door and immediately spotted Booth pacing up and down outside the Motor Vehicle Office.  Once Booth saw the police, he made a threatening gesture towards them with his rifle. This behaviour caused a higher degree of concern for the officers.  Booth quickly left the building and the 3 police officers followed behind him.  As the three officers followed him for 200 yards, they repeatedly called to Booth to stop and to drop his rifle.  Booth did neither and continued walking.  As he crossed the dried up bottom of Peterson Creek, Booth gestured at the police with his hand to stay away.  When the officers persisted in their pursuit and continued to call to him, Booth pointed his rifle at them and yelled for them to leave him alone.  This scene was witnessed by several elderly citizens who lived nearby.
           
When Booth went up on a timber roadway bridge over the creek, Cst Pedersen went down in the dry creek bed in an attempt to outflank Booth and cut him off before he could make it to the bush on higher ground.  As Cst Pedersen got within 25 yards of the gunman, Cst Keck and Weisgerber made a move to close in on Booth on the bridge.  At that point Booth opened fire on Cst Pedersen with 3 rounds from his rifle - 2 rounds hit him.   The first one ripped across his back, cutting his Sam Browne cross strap.  Cst Pedersen got off one shot in return before being killed by a shot to his head.  During the exchange of gunfire, Cst Weisgerber who was unarmed, ran for protection behind a wooden gravel skid box on the side of the road.  Cst Keck, armed with only his service revolver, ran for cover under the bridge.  Booth kept shooting at the two of them as he ran back and forth on the bridge. 

One of Cst Keck's shots hit Booth in the stomach, knocking him down and causing him to let go of his rifle.  Cst Weisgerber, seeing Booth was wounded, raced towards the bridge to grab the gun.  Before he could get there, Booth recovered and picked up his .303 rifle.  As Cst Weisgerber ran towards him, Booth raised his rifle and shot him 3 times in the abdomen.  Cst Weisgerber died at the scene within minutes of being wounded.

The shooting then stopped.  In the silence, Cst Keck edged out from under the bridge to get another shot away.  He had to lean out because his vision was hampered by the brim of his Stetson.  As he did, Booth fired again and this time killed Cst Keck with a shot to the head.  Booth walked off into the bush in the steep hills behind him.

Back at the detachment, S/Sgt d'Easum was unable to raise his three officers on the radio in the police cars so he went looking for them.  He arrived at the scene within minutes after the officers were killed and was informed by witnesses that Booth had run into the wooded area.  The S/Sgt notified his Superintendent and a massive search began for the killer. 
Resources were called in from various areas in the subdivision and surrounding detachments.  Because there were insufficient service rifles for this many members, officers were advised to arm themselves with large calibre hunting rifles.  To help with the search a helicopter was called in from the nearby Kamloops Airport and within an hour a police service dog was set on the killer's trail.

Cpl Jack While, a marksman with a rifle, along with two other officers in the search party, drove up onto a high plain above the site of the shootings.  By staying above Booth, they hoped to contain him in the immediate area.  Cpl White was in plainclothes and for two hours, he and 2 other members cautiously worked their way down the slope towards Peterson Creek looking for Booth.  Just before noon, one of the officers heard a noise over the crest of a hill in front of them. 

The officer silently signalled to Cpl White but before anything could be discussed, Booth suddenly appeared before them, standing upright and pointed his rifle at them.  Cpl White realized he did not have time to swing his rifle to shoot before Booth could fire so he fired a shot at the ground and it startled Booth who took cover as did the officers.  
The officers could hear Booth working the bolt of his rifle to reload. Cpl White timed how long it took Booth to load another bullet into rifle.   Booth fired a shot which hit a large rock and ducked down to reload again. Cpl White came up from behind cover, took aim and waited for Booth to expose himself to make his next shot.  When Cpl. White saw Booth's head edging out behind the back side of a tree, he immediately fired and killed Booth.

The chase was over but the grieving had just begun.  Three young wives were widowed.  The entire community in Kamloops was paralyzed with shock.  The nation shook its head in disbelief. On Friday June 22nd, 1962, a combined funeral service for the 3 fallen officers was held at the Kamloops Memorial Arena.  1500 citizens from all walks of life listened sombrely as Reverend Irving gave the eulogy over the flag-draped coffins.  Each member's Stetson rested atop the Union Jacks (Canada's official flag was still 3 years away).  After the service, thousands lined the streets as the bodies of Cst Keck and Cst Weisgerber passed in a procession to the Hillside Cemetery in Kamloops.  Cst Pedersen's remains were taken to Vernon for burial in Pleasant Valley Cemetery.

The three RCMP officers had a great deal in common.  They were young, trim, active and handsome.  All had beautiful wives and were in the prime of their early manhood.  Cst Keck and his wife Ann had a two year old son and they were expecting another child.  Betty Pedersen gave birth to her son seven months after her husband's funeral.


'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Mr. Brian Porter, Canadian author



'FRIENDS NOT FORGOTTEN'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Last Post: Reg.#31436, Corporal D. C. Cooke



'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

In Memory of Reg.#21052, Edward J. Hounsell

 
In Memory of Reg.#21052, Edward J. Hounsell
'Friends Not Forgotten'

Reg.# 21052, Edward J. Hounsell passed away in Ottawa on 13 August 2008.  

Ed donated his body to The University of Ottawa and is remembered at Pinecrest Cemetery, Ottawa.

Pinecrest Cemetery has a special section sponsored by University of Ottawa Anatomy Dept. There is a marker honoring all donors, but neither Ed nor any other donor is mentioned specifically. 

The section is near the reception area shaded by a beautiful tree. The day of his service was June 1, 2010.

Contributors and Appreciation:
 Ottawa Vet. Harold Pretty and
 Joan Hounsell
'Maintain Our Memories'
J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Monday, June 11, 2012

Sunday, June 10, 2012

Saturday, June 9, 2012

Friday, June 8, 2012

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Neighbours OPP and RCMP


Neighbours OPP and RCMP

Constable S. B. pushes her Highway Patrol  Cruiser along Highway 7 which runs out of Ottawa west towards Toronto, ON

Here she recognized 'Buffalo Joe' and asks for my autograph in her 'notebook'. I promised not to tell her Sergeant! 

What a swell sport! 

Meticulous, alert, professional and a great Ambassador for the OPP!

The photo was taken by a mysterious woman identified only as a teacher in Ottawa.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

King George V Silver Jubilee 1935




J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

In Memory of Reg.#12556, Norman Terrio, Marine Division



In Memory of my father, Reg.#12556, Norman Terrio

'Friends Not Forgotten'

This photo of Norman Terrio in RCMP Marine Service uniform is a family memento cherished by his son Mr. David Terrio.

Beginning in 1935, Norman Terrio served almost five years in the Force of which nearly four years were on the open seas.

The following explanation of RCMP Marine uniforms (and humour) is provided by David Terrio:

"The men in [the RCMP Marine Service] wore a uniform not unlike the old naval uniforms worn by the Royal Canadian Navy. 

There were minor differences between the two uniforms. The Cap Tallies read MARINE RCMP SECTION and the large collars on the RCMP uniform had one 1/2 inch wide white stripe, instead of the Navy's three narrow white stripes. 

The ranks held by both units were the same and the only difference between the Chief Petty Officer, and Officer's uniform, was the Cap Badge which was the same Cap Badge worn in the Navy with the addition of the letters RCMP across the center of the badge. 

The Marine Section of the RCMP was permitted to wear moustaches, whereas the Navy members were not. This made for a few interesting incidents between the two units. Many a Navy Officer was to be taken up short for bawling out a man with a moustache to learn on closer examination that he was not navy".

Reg.#12556, Norman Terrio died in 2003. He is buried in Sackville, Nova Scotia.

(Sources) [pdf]: 

Roscoe, Spurgeon G. Sixth Section of the manuscript: Radio Stations Common? Not This Kind. p. 35.)

Additional information can be found at:
 
ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE MARINE SERVICE HISTORICAL REVIEW. January 2007; also [pdf]: The Origins and Growth of the Canadian Customs Preventive Service Fleet in the Maritime Provinces and Eastern Quebec, 1892-1932, David J. McDougall

I am very appreciative to Mr.David Terrio for providing this snap of his father in RCMP Marine as well as the story. Thank you!

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Last Post: Reg.#19008, S/Sgt. W. H. C. Rowan


 
 Last Post: Reg.#19008, S/Sgt. W. H. C. Rowan

'Friends Not Forgotten'

It is with great sorrow that I must inform you of the passing of retired S/Sgt. Cameron Rowan (78 yrs.) on Friday June 1st. of Tatamagouche, Nova Scotia.

S/Sgt. Rowan joined the RCMP in 1955 and served in Kentville, Pictou, Tatamagouche, Amherst, Antigonish, Ottawa with retirement in Halifax.

Mr. Rowan was the father in law of Sgt. Dave Fraser, "H" Div. VIP Security Section.

Unfortunately, we only learned about this late yesterday (June 4, 2012) and the visitations had already occurred on June 3rd.

We wish to express our sincere condolences to Cynthia, David and their families for their loss.


Contributors and Appreciation:

Gary Latour, S/S/M and
C/Supt. Brian Brennan
"H" Division

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685 

Monday, June 4, 2012

Last Post: Robert 'Bob' Davis


Last Post: Robert 'Bob' Davis
'Friends Not Forgotten '

Obituary
 
Robert passed away peacefully after a short illness at the Ottawa Hospital, General Site on May 21, 2012 in his 77th year. Loving husband of Loretta. Cherished father of Rob (Danielle), Carolyn, and Glen (Patti). Proud grandfather of Patrick, Holly and Ryan.

Cremation has taken place. 

A Celebration of Life Gathering will be held on Friday, June 8, 2012 from 12 noon until time of Celebration Service at 1:00 p.m. at Capital Memorial Chapel, 3700 Prince of Wales Dr., Nepean. 

If desired, donations made to The Ottawa Hospital Foundation, ICU Department would be appreciated by the family. Condolences can be made via www.capitalmemorial.ca

I believe this member to be Reg.#19247 / O.1115, Inspector R. H. Davis 

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685