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Thursday, June 30, 2011

Birthday, Reg.#15070, W.F. MacRae

C A N A D A  


'Friends Not Forgotten'

Birthday Greetings to
Supt. W. F. 'Bill' MacRae

Long serving member, retired friend, Supt. W. F. 'Bill' MacRae recently celebrated his birthday. For fear of being paraded again, Supt. MacRae has instructed me not to disclose his true age. I replied with: 'Sir, I won't say a word'.  Actually, he's ninety minus five.

In this photo are two friends; far left is retired member A. E. Nicholson of Regina, Supt. W. F. MacRae, and far right is active Regina Vet. Bill Greenslade.

We salute Supt. MacRae on his special birthday and wish him many, many more years of good health.

Many old timers say that the Parade Square at 'Depot' has never been so lonely since W. F. MacRae marched off it for his final time!

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#11789, C. L. Donaldson

C A N A D A


'Friends Not Forgotten'

In Memory of Reg.#11789, 
C. L. 'Spike' Donaldson

Rich and memorable stories of the Force originate 'in the field'. The reason and the rise for stories in the field is because the police officer's environment is filled with unexpected happenings -- many incidents may be sad while others are humerous. 

Last weekend, an 'ole friend, Mr. Bert Cameron,  visited our home. He's only eighty three and a youthful New Brunswicker. Mr. Cameron spoke about 'Spike' Donaldson since 'Spike' had been posted to St. Stephen, NB in the 1940's. Apparently, 'Spike' had always been a ladies man and he had a couple close calls with the OC.

Jack White wrote this story about 'Spike' and I've been wanting to tell it for many years.

'Spike' Donaldson was once In Charge of Broadview Det. in 'F' Div. One day, he invited his girlfriend, a nurse,  (later his wife), into the private portion of the Detachment.  News soon reached the ear of the OC Sub/Div who immediately dispatched an investigator to Broadview Det.

'Spike' was forewarned that the OC's man was enroute to his Detachment. So, rather than get caught, he called his friend the local doctor. The doctor,  called the ambulance plus stretcher and recommended that 'Spike' be taken into Regina for an exam.  As well, the doctor insisted that a local nurse escort the poor patient as 'Spike' should not be left unattended.

All went well. Enroute to the Regina hospital, 'Spike' seemed to recover from his ailment.  Shortly afterwards,  he reported back to duty. He explained to the OC that he took an unexpected bad spell so he called a nurse who inturn called the doctor. He was only following doctor's orders.

'Spike' Donaldson died in 1985 and he is buried in California.

'Maintain Our Memories'

Appreciation: To Vet Jack White and to Mr. Bert Camerson of Ottawa.

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

The F. B. Pearson Building, RCMP Surrey

C A N A D A


Memorial Building for RCMP
proudly named
'The F. B. Pearson Building'

Community of Surrey and the RCMP
dedicate the
'The F. B. Pearson Building'

by
Superintendent Ric Hall (Rt'd)


Reg.# 6298, Sergeant F. (Frank) B. Pearson was born in 1888. He came to Canada from England at about the age of 20 years. He joined the RNWMP in 1914 and he was one of the earliest members of the police to be posted to Surrey Detachment in the 1930's.

To conmemmorate the goodness, his spirit, volunteerism and his hard work, it was decided to name the new expansion annex of the RCMP Detachment after Sergeant 'Frank' Pearson. He would have been very proud of the Memorial Building, but it's generally thought that Sgt. Pearson would not have expected such an honour or such a surprise. In addition to serving the Force and the community of Surrey, Sergeant Pearson also served in WWI and WWII.

The new expansion building is about 34,000-square-feet of much needed space for the RCMP. From the early days of fifteen members or so, the RCMP now employs over 640 members and the number continues to grow. The new space will lessen the previous crowded working conditions. The Opening Ceremony for the F. B. Pearson Memorial Building was attended by the Senior RCMP Officer, Assistant Commissioner Fraser MacRae and Surrey's Mayor, Dianne Watts. A large group of Sergeant Pearson's family was also in the audience as well as many other members and guests. 

Canadians, the RCMP and especially the Community of Surrey is very proud of Sgt. 'Frank' Pearson and the lasting Memorial to him. The RCMP collectively hails Sergeant Pearson with 'Bravo'! 

Sgt. Pearson died in 1965. He is buried in South Surrey Sunneyside Lawn Cemetery.

Appreciation: Photos also by Superintendent Ric Hall (Rt'd)

'Maintain Our Memories'
J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Monday, June 27, 2011

Phillip Charters - in search for...

C A N A D A


In search for Phillip Charters,
thought to be a member of NWMP or RNWMP

Hello Mr. Healy,

I am trying to find some information on a Phillip Charters - born about 1882 in Leicester, England
who emigrated to Canada as a young man and apparently joined the RCMP.

He was my mother's Uncle, and she left the family an autobiography which says that Phillip joined the Mounties and was killed.

I've checked your brilliant site but cannot find a mention of a Charters; and wonder if there is a record of his service and if he perhaps died in an accident or of illness.

I would be most grateful if you could advise me if such details exist or of any link I could explore.


Regards,
Tony Stafford
Email: buttercombe@btinternet.com


**Reply sent to Mr. Stafford, saying that no records of Mr. Charters exist to me at this time. Mr. Stafford was asked to keep in touch with me. As well, Mr. Charters' name was added to the database as a record in the event another enquiry about him is received.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Sunday, June 26, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#11062, Cst. C. H. Butler

C A N A D A


'Friends Not Forgotten'

In Memory of Reg.#11062, Crarence Henry Butler
'Died While Serving'


Reg.# 11062, Constable Clarence Henry Butler joined the Force in 1931. He was posted to Yorkton, SK.

Cst. Butler died on August 7, 1943.

Appreciation: photo: Ottawa Vet. John Henderson


'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Saturday, June 25, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#16997, Joseph D. Watson

C A N A D A


'Friends Not Forgotten'


In Memory of Reg.#16997, Joseph D. Watson
RCMP and RCAF

Introduction:

Force Historian Jack White left us a message that Reg.#16997, Constable Joseph Douglas Watson joined the RCMP in 1951. He was transferred to  'L' Div. (PEI) where he purchased his discharge in 1953.

Most recently, Vet John Henderson of Ottawa has been researching Watson's life and career. John Henderson tells us that after the RCMP, Watson joined the RCAF. At some point in Watson's early RCAF career, he committed suicide.

Death of former Constable Joseph Douglas Watson, RCMP to RCAF 

John Henderson refers to author Art Klassen, who picks up the Watson story...

Art Klassen say; 'A pilot training with a T33 Jet at Southport decided one Sunday morning
[that] he had enough of life. He took off with his jet and climbed to an extreme height and then power nosed (sic) dived into the frozen ground. There was only a hole with some plane parts left to see. This happened a mile northwest of the Point next to the farm I was farming. I had some engine parts that I found in the spring near the spot and kept them for a number of years as a grim reminder of what happened'.

Source: It's About Time - Community Histories: Poplar Point & St. Marks. p.217
Copies are available from:

Poplar Point/St. Marks History Committee 2007
Box 174, Poplar Point, MB
R0H 0Z0

'Maintain our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
REg.#23685

Friday, June 24, 2011

Vet of the Month - July, 2011

C A N A D A 


'Friends Not Forgotten'

Assistant Commissioner Alexander Neville Eames
Born 1883 - Wales
Died 1965 - Vancouver, BC

Read the story and follow the remarkable career of Reg.# 5700, Officer Number 0.209, Assistant Commissioner Alexander  Neville Eames.

Assistant Commissioner Eames was born in Wales in 1883. He joined the Force in 1913 at the age of twenty nine years.

In a very short time, he received his Commission. He accepted several transfers and was responsible for opening Pincher Creek Detachment in 1919.  About 1929, he was transferred as Officer Commanding of the Western Arctic. It was while he was in this position that he supervised the famous case tagged as the 'Mad Trapper', a man who has never been identified.

For the story, copy and paste the following link into your browser

http://www.rcmpgraves.com/vetcorner/vetmonth-jul11.html

or go to my Home Page at www.rcmpgraves.com, scroll down to Vet of the Month, then find July, 2011


'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Thursday, June 23, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#3826, Cst. Frank Aitken

C A N A D A


'Friends Not Forgotten'

In Memory of North West Mounted Police,
Reg.#3826, Cst. Frank Aitken
Cst. Frank Aitken's obituary:

Service Court: (SC):

Deserted. Surrendered. Arrested. Charged. Convicted. Sentenced. Discharged. Died. Buried.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#13121, Cpl. T. E. Baker

C A N A D A  


'Friends Not Forgotten'

In Memory of Reg.#13121, Cpl. Thomas E Baker
Hello Joe,

I happened upon this gravestone in the Fort Langley Cemetery recently and thought I would forward it for your database.


As you can see in the photo it is well maintained.

Thank you for creating such an interesting website.

Cheers,

Cst. Ryan Begley,
Reg.# 54473

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#9167, Cpl. S.A. Jewers

C A N A D A


'Friends Not Forgotten'

In Memory of Reg.#9167,
Corporal Samuel Adam Jewers

Bravery


Supt. Brian Brennan, presently OIC Federal Policing in 'H' Div. located the grave of Corporal Samuel A. Jewers -- a brave man who, many years ago, demonstrated the best values in the Force by saving the life of a another man.

Research for the RCMP National Graves Website forever presents surprises -- it's like a fresh daily dig -- a new discovery makes the graves project unusual and exciting.  Another unknown RCMP grave pops up just at the time when I think volunteers have captured the location of all our graves.

The history behind Cpl. Jewers is also memorable. Over time, Cpl. Jewers may have been forgotten so it's right that we remember him for his bravery.

I owe deceased Vet Jack White another favour for he did the original research on Cpl. Jewers.

Cpl. Jewers began his career in law enforcement with the Dominion Police. He joined the RCMP in 1920 and spent his career in Nova Scotia.

One day in 1936, Corporal Jewers saw a man in the water clinging to a capsized boat. The man was about a mile from shore in the Bedford Basin, Halifax, NS. In spite of present dangers including a rough sea and high winds, Cpl. Jewers rowed out and recovered an unconscious man. Cpl. Jewers performed first aid on the victim, Mr. Robert Fraser, then rowed him to shore for medical attention. It was reported that the bravery of Cpl. Jewers saved the life of Mr. Fraser. Bravo!


Corporal Jewers received a Commendation for his bravery

Cpl. Jewers retired from the Force in 1945 and he died in 1978. He is buried on a beautiful and peaceful Nova Scotian hillside in St. Margaret's Bay.

*Appreciation: to deceased Vet. Jack White for historical facts and to
Supt. Brian Brennan, serving 'H' Div. for the photos



'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Monday, June 20, 2011

New York and The Twins

NEW YORK AND THE TWINS

IT'S A SMALL WORLD


An International Colossal Mystery
Left Unsolved

Mostly everyone wants to call Brooklyn their home town. My brothers, sisters and me honestly can. Our maternal ancestry originated on Clinton St. just off Flatbush Ave. in Brooklyn, New York beginning in the mid 1800's. As I grew, I also admired the great American contemporary music celebrities who also truly called Brooklyn their home -- favorites Neil Diamond and Barbra Steisand to name just two.

New York often calls me home. New York feels like home. I am home. Cathy, my wife, will remark that she notices how far more comfortable I am in New York  than other towns which we visit. I enjoy Washington, Boston and San Francisco, but they're not home.

For years as kids, we walked the beaches and swam in the shadow of the Twin Towers -- the Towers stood as skylining symbols of my parents -- tall and solid. Always present, always glistening. The Twins and the Empire State Building point skyways in the direction of heaven; it's the reason they are described as uplifting -- believe me New Yorkers will say so. We cried too with New Yorkers at the loss of The Twins. It's a day which I will never forget.

I breathe Brooklyn. It's a maternal instinct for me to return to Brooklyn, Long Island & Jamaica Bay where I spent summers on the beach as a kid.  Over the years, I've met troops of cousins who remain loving and kind to my wife, my family in New Brunswick and me. 

Today a new generation of younger Healy's, Miller's and Dros' are on the scene in New York. I've been struck by their interest in ancestory including my parent's background and the Healy-Miller Brooklyn connection. For the younger set, there remains a lot of mystery as to their hook-up with Canada and the Mounties.

New York is a town of mysteries.  A new mystery happened to my wife and me in the last few weeks. We were browzing at the Apple Glass Cube Store at 5th and 58th 'nigh near midnight. A young female NYPD Patrol Officer came into the store presumingly on an investigation.

After her enquiries with the stone manager, the NYPD Officer prepared to leave but she had to pass by me to exit the store.  I gently stopped her and asked for a picture. She agreed. She was very patient and an excellent conversationalist. What a wonderful NYPD Ambassador! I began to think that she was from Brooklyn, perhaps a Healy cousin, but '...no, she said, I live in the City.'

After the snap, we intended to compare US/Canada police styles. But, all of a sudden, her police radio cracked with an emergency. In an instant, the NYPD Officer turned, ran up the stairs and fled faster than a flea chasing a fox. Flashbacks of  Zorro jumping for his horse and an escape criss-crossed my mind. She disappeared. We didn't get her name or badge number!

Seems like I am always fronting a new mystery.  Perhaps we'll meet the Officer again if we spot her jogging through Central Park?

I'm convinced she's a Healy cousin. You can't tell me otherwise.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Sunday, June 19, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#15134, R.D. Crissal

C A N A D A


'Friends Not Forgotten'
Reg.#15134, Cpl. Robert Douglas Crissal


 
Members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in front of Tham’s Studio Camera Crafts,  Saskatoon Saskatchewan

'E' Div. Vet. Sheldon Boles said; 'The members in the photo above were identified by 'Robbie' Robinson who was stationed in Smeaton, north east of Prince Albert, SK in the late 1950’s and early 1960’s.'

Left to right; Bert Pless, Bert  Sabaston, Ned Young, Jack MacLean and Bob Crissall, (deceased).

Reg.# 15134, Cpl. Robert Douglas Crissall was born in 1927. He joined the Force in 1948 and he retired in 1974. He spent his career in 'F' Division (Saskatchewan). Cpl. Crissall died in 1981 and he is buried in Edmonton, Alberta.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Photo: with permission and cooperation of 'E' Div. Vet. Sheldon Boles

Saturday, June 18, 2011

Reg.#267, Joseph Osborne Davis

C A N A D A

'Friends Not Forgotten'
Hi Joe;

Here's a little story about two brothers; one in the NWMP.

One brother, Joe Davis was an original in NWMP. On a particular day, he was on patrol in Swan River, Manitoba when he met his brother, Thomas Davis (later senator) who was going to Fort Gary for supplies for his business in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan.

Thomas Davis convinced his brother Joe Davis to quit the Force and join him in business. Soon, Joe quit the NWMP for a career in business with his brother. 

The two brothers originated from Montreal, QC. One brother (Tom) had his bride come out to Qu'Appelle by train from Montreal. From Qu Appelle, she would be horsed to Prince Albert where they intended to get married.

Joe, the other brother agreed to go to Qu'Appelle to bring the girlfriend back to P.A. But, before he returned to Prince Albert, he fell in love with his brother's betrothed and the two up and got married.

Interestingly, their business partnership suddenly disolved.

However, the two boys went on to make famous, for example, Tom became a Senator and a Saskatchewan village was named after him (Davis, SK).

Joe Davis, the ex member and his wife raised siblings who became very prominent. One child eventually became an Ambassador to China, another son became a federal judge. The Davis name is well known in the PA area even though no one from the family now resides in PA.

The Davis clan have a family burial coliseum in the St. Mary's Cemetery. It's the final resting place of the two brothers; Joe and Tom. 

Contributor: Our thanks to Vet. Ron Smith, 'F' Div.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J.J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Friday, June 17, 2011

St. Mary's Cemetery in PA., Saskatchewan

C A N A D A


'Friends Not Forgotten'


St. Mary's Cemetery
Prince Albert, Saskatchewan

This a photo is of St. Mary's Cemetery in P.A., SK.  There are seven Honour Roll members and numerous other historic members buried here. 

St. Mary's was the second church built in Prince Albert. It was built by Angican Bishop McLean in 1874/75. 

In 1973, a Centennial Project was that all the R.C.M.P. graves be re-dedicated. The Centennial Parade was led by Insp D. J. Wright. 

St. Mary's Cemetery is in itself a history lesson as members of the NWMP, the RNWMP and the RCMP each played a very prominent role in the settling of this area.

Yours truly,

'F' Div. Vet. Ron Smith

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg,#23685

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Reg.# 0.473, Inspector R.C C. Butt

C A N A D A


'Friends Not Forgotten'

In Memory of Reg.# 0.473,
Inspector Robert Charles Clayton Butt
Good evening Joe,

I learned about your website this afternoon.  I am one of the granddaughters of Insp. Robert Charles Clayton Butt and thought I would e-mail you to say "thank you" for your website - it is a wonderful remembrance.

I also noticed that my grandfather's birthday is listed incorrectly.   If possible, could you please change it to:  September 15, 1909? 

My Dad (Robert Clayton Butt - his son) may contact you with more information to be added.

Blessings always,

Grandniece,
Karen Hatch [mailto:karen.hatch@sympatico.ca]

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

RCMP Female Cap - Circa 1974

C A N A D A


DOWN THE 'DEPOT' GARDEN PATH


This female member's cap was issued at 'Depot' circa 1974 at the time of the early acceptance of women into the Force. Actually, at the time, I thought it was kinda 'stylish'?

Female members likely will oppose my opinion.

Contributed by Friend of the Force, Erik Nicholson

**Erik Nicholson asks if anyone knows how many of these female caps may have been issued?Erik Mr. Nicholson can be reached at: Nickolson [mailto:erik_n@telus.net]

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg..#23685

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

From the Saddle - The new RCMP/GRC Commissioner

C A N A D A



The RCMP Commissioner's job

For the record, I have no intentions of applying and I haven't been asked but I am curious about how the RCMP Commissioner is chosen for the top job. 

It all began in '64 at 'Depot'. Sgt. Tom Foster told 'G' Troop that we were 'potential material' for the Force's top job. Maybe he fed the same line to every troop? Anyway, if he misled anyone, he's been forgiven.
Still, Sgt. Foster was inspirational so I went back to scrubbing 'Honey' with new vigor. I reasoned, after all, that a very, very clean horse was a sure track to the Commissioner's job. Further, I believed that I could potentially receive a commission at seven years service as my first Commissioner G. B. McClellan supposedly had done. Which reminds me that George B. was very human, a wonderful story teller and he also held a sense of humor. George B. was educated at Royal Military College so he was not a lawyer and he was not born of a wealthy stream. Yet, if offered, he was reputed to enjoy the best of Scotch. 

The story is told that George B. was on an inspection tour of the Yukon. He had also been invited to the Annual Regimental Dinner. When the time came to get dressed, he realized that he had forgotten his 'banana pants'. The CO put a call out to the most stoutly man in the Division. Fortunately, a Corporal fit the bill and gave his pants to George B. with no hesitation. The Commissioner was forever grateful. Too bad, the Corporal never got promoted in spite of his act of mercy. Later, the Corporal's wife never forgot to tell her friends that '...perhaps my husband never went very far in the Force, but his pants went right to the top!'

Back. I am a novice mystery writer today and I'm forever on the search for a good hook. I have read the Commissioner's job description -- it's published by the Senior Personnel and Special Projects Secretariat in Ottawa. The document was of some help, but the thought crossed my mind how lofty it is written. It calls for a miracle and I have never witnessed one. But, I happen to know very special people who are expert at predicting miracles -- no word from them yet.


The paper calls for alot and the job may remain vacant as there are few people, if any, who could fill its wishes. If I had been asked, I would have boiled the whole thing down to one line; 'Canada requires an honest and decisive leader for the Commissioner's job. He or she will easily talk of their broad police experiences, preferably has a graduate degree and is comfortable in multi languages.'

I am proud to say that I've known a few Commissioners down through the years. About eight or nine. I admired the cool thoughtful manner of Commissioner Norman Inkster, O.C. He looked to the future. And, he could stand on his own two feet.

Perhaps I knew Commissioner Murray better. I saw him in action. I admired his experiences and he easily related to a constable on patrol. Commissioner Murray was approachable, very calm in the heat of debate and he had a great memory for recall. He could easily tell a good yarn. I always thought that he was comfortable in his role as Commissioner.

Perhaps I knew Commissioner Busson best. I met her at 'Depot' on her first day of training around '74. We were not close friends but I would count Commissioner Busson as a professional colleague. She always took time to say hi to my wife and me. She was experienced on the operational side. She unquestionably had the strong confidence of her subordinates. She was decisive and not hesitant to confront sensitive issues. She was well educated, an excellent public speaker and she possessed a wonderful sense of humour.  I was extremely proud to call her Commissioner Busson and the remainder of the Force also felt the same emotion. 

The selection for the next Commissioner need not be difficult. Here's a sure recipe to follow. Applicants ought to take a wee bit of Commissioner Insker, a dribble of Commissioner Murray and a drop of Commissioner Busson. This Commissioner's cake will give Canadians all they can enjoy plus the frosting.

At least, that's how I see it from my Saddle.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685


Saturday, June 11, 2011

In Memory of Reg.#2101, Cst. T. A. Dixon

C A N A D A

In Memory of
Reg.# 2010, Cst. Thomas Alexander Dickson

'Friends Not Forgotten'
Reg.#2101, Thomas Dickson came to the Yukon in 1898 as a member of the North West Mounted Police (NWMP) . He was stationed at Tagish Lake.

In 1900, after about six year service, he left the NWMP and married Louise, a Tagish First Nation woman.

Louise's uncle, Skookum Jim Mason, employed Dickson as a bodyguard and especially to protect his gold. Dickson also ran a fish camp on Tagish Lake along with his thirteen children.

Dickson became renowned as one of the first big game guides in the Yukon. In 1916, he was the Game Warden of Kluane Lake and his homesteand was on Dickson Creek, which named for him. In 1949 he retired due to ill health. Thomas Dickson died in Whitehorse in 1952.

Photo and Contributor: Superintendent Brian Brennan, OIC Federal Policing, 'H' Div., Halifax

'Maintain our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Friday, June 10, 2011

Burnaby's Memorial for Cst. T. Tomfohr

C A N A D A


Burnaby Detachment Annual Memorial
for
Reg.# 25214, Cst. Terry Eugene Tomfohr
Honour Roll # 134

'Friends Not Forgotten'


Cst. Tomfohr joined the Force on October 25, 1966. After training at ‘Depot’ Div. he was posted to Burnaby Detachment, ‘E’ Division.  

About three weeks after his arrival at Burnaby Detachment, he responded to a complaint of unruly youths in the vicinity of Burnaby Mountain. While searching for the youths in the darkness, Cst. Tomfohr fell over a ravine to his death.

The location of his death is not far from the present day site of Simon Fraser University.

The link here was kindly sent in by:

John A. Buis S/S/M
Executive NCO to the OIC
Burnaby Detachment
'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Thursday, June 9, 2011

Last Post : Reg# 26156, Jan K. Dudzinski

C A N A D A


Last Post : Reg.# 26156, Jan Kazimierz 'Casey' Dudzinski
'Friends Not Forgotten'


Obituary
Suddenly in St. Thomas, ON on Wednesday, June 1st, 2011 in his 66th year; beloved husband of the late Sharon Wood (2006); loved father of Stephen and his wife Lisa of Toronto and Jeffrey of Brampton; dear grandfather of Rachel; Casey will be sadly missed by his sister Vivian Pryzbec, his friend Paulette, other relatives and many friends.

Friends may call at the Dods & McNair Funeral Home & Chapel, 21 First St., Orangeville (519-941-1392) on Monday, June 6th, 2011 from 2:00 – 4:00 and 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Tuesday, June 7th, 2011 at 11:00 a.m.

Memorial donations in memory of Casey may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

Source: Vets Toronto Div. and Jack O'Reilly

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

In Memory, Reg.#21512, Cst. AOM Lepine

C A N A D A




 In Memory, Reg.#21512, Cst. Archille O.M. Lepine

'Friends Not Forgotten'

Reg.#21512, Constable 'Archie' Lepine was posted to Patullo Bridge Detachment, 'E' Div. in 1962. He was driving his police motorcycle on the King George Highway near Whalley, BC when a car turned unexpectedly in front of him.

Cst. Lepine died as a result of the injuries which he received.

A couple years later I was chosen for the 'Bike' Course in Cloverdale, BC. I recall that our Chief Harley Davidson Instructor, S/Sgt. Harvey often reminded us of the unforseen dangers which bike
riders must expect especially in heavy traffic such as the Lower Mainland experiences.

Soon, it will be forty-nine years since Cst. Lepine died.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Tuesday, June 7, 2011

'Depot' Div. Grave Digging Detail - 1958

C A N A D A


'Depot' Div. Grave Digging Detail - 1958

Hi again Joe;

Your story about digging the grave upon arrival at 'Depot'  in 1964 was also very familiar to me.

I joined the Force September 22 1958 and I arrived at 'Depot' two days later. Before being squaded and while waiting for the rest of "F" Troop to arrive, four of us were assigned to dig the winter supply of graves, three in number to be exact. I don't recall now just how long it took us, a few days I suppose.

Anyway, I too was curious about who may have been placed in those graves so in October (2008) so when Fabulous "F" Troop had our fifty year reunion, my wife and I toured 'Depot' Cemetery to check out those three graves.

It wasn't too hard to figure them out of course since the three dates of death on the stones were all side by side and the first three burials after September 24th 1958. Great memories!

Dee Jessiman came off the Ride while we were still taking equitation training and began his training as a Riding Instructor. Yes, a very colorful guy!

Regards,

Rod Macdonald
Reg.#20654

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685

Reg.#1469, B. A. Lutz, Sudden Death

C A N A D A

Reg.#1469, Constable Boag Albert Lutz, NWMP
Sudden Death
'Friends Not Forgotten'
Hi Joe;
I have all the records about Reg.#1469, Boag Albert Lutz from the Archives in Ottawa. I also have the written reports from all three of the men involved in the accident.
The members were on their way for a weekend of fishing at Jackfish Lake when the horse got spooked and bolted throwing all three from the wagon. My great uncle Boaz Lutz was the only one that died on that April 27th, 1895 day as a result of the accident.
I don't live near North Battleford Sask. I live in Kingston Ontario, but thought if the grave could still be identified I would like to make the trip out west to see it.
I understand that the R.C.M.P. assign people to look after the graves and wanted to know if it went back as far as the N.W.M.P. I was wondering if there was a special section for the members of the N.W.M.P. in the cemetery?

Thanks Joe, for all your efforts.

It was very interesting to get all the reports from Ottawa, they included all the letters from Boaz's brothers and listed everything that was in his kit at the time of his death.  

Yours truly,
Earl M. Lutz,
Kingston, Ontario
Dear Mr. Lutz,

I am pleased to tell you that Mr. Reg. Keatley, Friend of the Force of Calgary, Alberta was kind enough to get this photo for you.

'Maintain Our Memories'

J. J. Healy,
Reg.#23685